The Vegetarian

“‘I used to be dark’: There were times when he wanted to express it this way. I used to be dark. The monochrome world, entirely devoid of the colors he was now experiencing, had had a calmness that was beautiful in its way, but it wasn’t somewhere he could go back to. It seemed the happiness that had enabled him to feel that quiet peace was now lost to him forever. And yet he found himself unable to think of this as a loss. All of his energy was taken up in trying to cope with the excitement, the heightened awareness of living in the present moment.”

The Vegetarian, p. 107
By Han Kang
Published 2016 by Hogarth

Homegoing

“We believe the one who has the power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So when you study history, you must always ask yourself, Whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth? Once you have figured that out, you must find that story too. From there, you begin to get a clearer, yet still imperfect, picture.”

Homegoing, pp. 226-7
By Yaa Gyasi
Published 2016 by Knopf

I Will Send Rain

“Life was mostly about remembering or waiting, Birdie thought. Remembering when things were better, waiting for things to get better again. There was never a now, never a time when you said, ‘This is it.’ You thought there would be that time – when you turned sixteen, when Cy finally kissed you, when school got out – but then you ended up waiting for something else.”

I Will Send Rain, p. 178
By Rae Meadows
Published 2016 by Henry Holt and Co.

Behold the Dreamers

“The Bakweri people of Limbe believe August is a cursed month. The rain falls too hard and for too long; rivers rise up too high and too fast. Dry days are few; chilly nights are many. The month is long, dreary, and hostile, and it is for this reason that many in the tribe do not marry, build homes, or start businesses in August. They wait for it to go away, along with its curses. Jende Jonga, a Bakweri man, believed nothing in curses.”

Behold the Dreamers, p. 355
By Imbolo Mbue
Published 2016 by Random House