An Uncommon Education

“There was something about her manner that was sobering me up, and I remember thinking at the time that it must have been the sharpness of hate. Looking back, that’s the funny thing. I remember thinking she just hated me. It didn’t occur to me that such vitriol could have nothing at all to do with me, that such profound emotion must run far deeper than any single relationship ever could.”
An Uncommon Education, p. 271
By Elizabeth Percer
Published 2012

 
Follow on Bloglovin

 

Landline

“Nobody would ever describe Neal as fully animated. Or expressive. His thoughts didn’t play across his face like light on water. Which means Georgie cataloged every flinch, every flick of his eyes, and tried to figure out what they meant. This seemed like a great way to spend the rest of her life.”
Landline, p. 146
By Rainbow Rowell
Published 2014

Follow on Bloglovin

How I Live Now

“There never were seven more silent human beings in the back of a truck, we were too stunned even to cry or speak. When we reached Reston Bridge our driver, who I knew was a close friend of the Major’s, got out of the truck and stood there for a minute trying to get up the courage to go inside and tell Mrs. M what happened, but first he turned to us and said in a voice that sounded broken and full of rage, In case anyone needed reminding This is a War. And the way he said those words made me feel like I was falling.”
How I Live Now, p. 105
By Meg Rosoff
Published 2004

Follow on Bloglovin

 

Me Before You

“Potential. Yes Potential. And I cannot for the life of me see how you can be content to live this tiny life. This life that will take place almost entirely within a five mile radius and contain nobody who will ever surprise you or push you or show you things that will leave your head spinning and unable to sleep at night.”
Me Before You, p. 205
By Jojo Moyes
Published 2012

Follow on Bloglovin

 

Tell the Wolves I’m Home

“When I was in the city, I always had the feeling that everyone could see right through me. Like all the real city people could see immediately that I was from the suburbs. No matter what I wore or how cool I tried to look, I could tell that Westchester was written all over me, head to toe. But not when I was with Finn. Finn was like a ticket into being a real city person. He had a glow that covered me in authentic city light.”
Tell the Wolves I’m Home, p. 204
By Carol Rifka Brunt
Published 2012

Follow on Bloglovin

Eleanor & Park
dining1s
Teddy
greycityscape1
The Interestings
writingdesk3s
The Glass Castle
america1s
The Picture of Dorian…
deadflowers1
The Boy Who Talked wit…
whitehouseresize5
The Invisible Circus
patinedladies2s
On the Road
natgeoedit5